Archive for January, 2007

Ilex pedunculosa | Longstalk Holly

Ilex pedunculosa | Longstalk Holly
STRENGTHS
Evergreen and easy. Interesting undulating leaves provides natural grace. Long stalks of red berries attract birds in winter. Nice for an informal hedge of small trees.

CARE
No serious pests or disease. Fine in wet soil.
NOTES
Best placed in place protected from cold winter winds and perhaps not too heat tollerant. Dioecious – needs male to pollinate females to flower and berry. One of the most underutilized hollies and best for cold hardiness. Can be hard to locate.

image Image pedunculosa leaves smooth

ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 5 – 8 | sun to light shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow to medium
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 20’ to 30’/15′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. multi-branced pyramidal, desnse folliage with some loose branches
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″ to 3″ eliptical with pointed tip, wavey edges without spines
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | very beautiful, shiny and smooth dark green resembles ficus, developes yellow cast in exposed sites

image Ilex pedunculosa new leaves

FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | delicate March-April, white to pale green, not showy
BERRIES | Red berries, showy, have the “long stalks” it’s named for
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL prefers slightly acid, good for urban setting, tollerant of pollution, moderately salt tollerant
Native to Japan, Korea, China
Arnold Arboretum / Ilex pedunculosa

Buckingham Nurseries, UK/Ilex aquifolium

image Ilex pendunculosa chartrues stem and big berries

image Ilex pedunculosa

Ilex decidua | Possumhaw

image Ilex decidua in winter

Ilex decidua | Possumhaw

STRENGTHS
Yikes! This looks a bit scary in the winter. Native to MD, a woodland naturalizer, but not normally planted in residential setting. Missouri Botanical Garden has some wonderful specimens. Might be used in urban forrest for errosion and nice food source for wildlife. Adds winter interest with red, orange, or yellow berries that ripen in fall and persist to April. If it grows in your gardens naturally, makes a nice filler for “back 40″. Silver gray bark is also a nice feature. Branches grow accross themselves. Great in wet lowlands.

CARE
Has an extensive root system, keep watered to establish. For a tidy, neat appearance, shear to shape in early spring. No serious problems, occasional leaf spot.

image Ilex decidua

NOTES
Dioecious – needs male nearby for females to berry. Usually pollinated by Ilex opaca

RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Warren’s Red’ available, heavy fruiting 15′ tall

ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 5 – 9 | full sun to full shade
GROWTH RATE ….. medium
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 20′-30′/7′ to 15′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Loose, rounded; many horizontal and ascending branches
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ obovate, impressed veins, obtusely serrated, thin, light
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | dark green, turning bright yellow in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | small white in spring
BERRIES | beautiful bright orange red

NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL does well in moist to dry and slightly alkaline
Native MD to FL and west to TX

NC State / Ilex decidua

MO Botanic Garden / Ilex decidua

Possumhaw wins the race!, originally uploaded by newfern.

Possumhaw closeup, originally uploaded by newfern.

Ilex aquifolium | English Holly

image English Holly leaves

Ilex aquifolium | English Holly

STRENGTHS
Evergreen and makes a good hedge, especially as a barrier. Has wavey and extremely spikey, leaves unique and quite destinct form other hollies. The spikes sometimes occur in the middle of the blade. Commonly planted on British seasides and grown as an understory tree or even topiary. id I. aquifolia by it’s chartreuse stems (growing for 2 years) and overly spikey leaves.

MY BAD ATTITUDE ABOUT HOLLIES
My bad attitude about hollies comes from the fact that many outgrow their homes and overwhelm and sometimes obliterate whatever is close by. Often planted as screens in tight spaces, when a much less burly plant would be better. Once overgrown, it is a project to remove them. They can be very nice when treated as small trees, given space and allowed to take on a more natural state. I like hollies pruned up as well to expose the branching. Of large leaved hollies, my favorite is the native Ilex opaca. I do not have a bad attitude about small leaved hollies, on the contrary. Ilex crenata or Ilex vomitoria are fabulous.

CARE
Won’t tollerate poor drainage. The root system resents being disturbed, so do not cultivate the soil around them. Hollies sometimes drop their old leaves due to transplant shock, but new foliage will soon emerge. Be careful not to overwater holly that has lost its leaves. Keep the soil moist during the summer growing season, but allow it to dry somewhat in early fall to allow the season’s growth to mature enough to resist winter damage. Grows naturally a bit more open if not pruned – a nice effect.
NOTES
Doesn’t like extreme heat and humdity. Use only in protected sites. Dioecious – needs male to pollinate females to flower and berry. I. aquifolia is used to as a parent for many hybid cultivars bacause it has so many positive qualities. Plant in spring with plenty of mulch. Rabbits are particularly fond of this species and will quickly remove the bark. When you purchase, need to specify cultivar because the options are limitless.
image English Holly 5' tall
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Pendula’ can be a good ground cover

‘Feros Argentea’ variegated (see below)
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 6 – 8 | sun to part shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow, especially in south and hot weather
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 15’ to 50’ / 15′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Densley pyramidal, heavily branched
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1″ to 3″ eliptical to obovate, wavey edges with spines
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | glossy dark green with some variagated cultivars
image English Holly bud

FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | delicate March-April, white to pale green, not showy
BERRIES | Red, yellow to orange berries
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL prefers moist well drained, fertile organic and slightly acid, good for urban setting
Native to UK. Very salt tolerant.

image Ilex aquifolia veriagated

image Ilex aquifolia

image Ilex aquifolia spikey leaves

Ilex crenata | Japanese Holly

image Ilex crenata 'Steed's' image Ilex cranata 'Soft Touch' image Ilex crenata 'Sky Pencil' image Ilex crenata 'Helleri' image Ilex crenata 'Soft Touch' image Ilex crenata berries

image Ilex crenata leaves

Ilex crenata | Japanese Holly

STRENGTHS
Evergreen, lovely and reliable with dainty a texture. Great for sun or shade, less expensive twin for Boxwoods. A new columnar cultivar, ‘Sky Pencil’ has been breaking new ground for use as alternative for italian cypress in residential landscapes. It’s a much more appropriate choice that can add European charm. Japanese Hollies are terrific foils for flamboyant flowering deciduous plants. Very versitile.

CARE
Watch for spider mites, they can be serious. Trim new growth during the growing season with sharp shears regularly to maintain shape of plant. Don’t trim in the winter months. Remove any unwanted growth on clear stems. Water regularly; – always try to keep growing medium moist, especially in the growing season.

NOTES
Needs protection from dry winds. Dioecious – needs male nearby for females to berry. Occassionaly over-used in some neighborhoods.
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
all very available…
‘Sky Pencil’ 10′ – 12′/2′ very slendar columnar
‘Steeds’ also columnar, not as slender or tall
‘Helleri’ low growing

ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 6 – 8 | sun to shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6’ to 10’

PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Densley upright, rounded, tidy
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1/2″ to 1″ eliptical to obovate, slightly toothed on upper half
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate (hollies alternate, while Boxes are opposite)
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | lustrous deep dark bluish green, dull on back
image Ilex crenata 'Sky Pencil' berries

FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | delicate March-April, white to pale green, not showy
BERRIES | Black, round drupe 1/4″ to 1/3″ in fall, persistent into spring

NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL prefers moist well drained, fertile organic and slightly acid, good for urban setting
Native to Japan, Korea, parts of Russia

Ilex crenata 'Sky Pencil' in a row
MO Botanical Garden / Ilex crenata ‘Sky Pencil’

VA Tech Dendrology / Ilex crenata

Caring For Conifers

:::::::::: GUEST BLOGGER ::::::::::

Caring For Conifers By Kathleen Franklin

Conifers are chiefly evergreen, with needles or scale leaves. They are cone-bearing trees that have evolved over hundreds of millions of years to form glorious forests that shelter an endless variety of wildlife. Conifers include pines, hemlocks, cypress, yews, junipers, fir, cedar, and spruce. Many conifers are slow growing, measured in just a few inches per year. Patience is a necessity, but the rewards are great. They are wonderfully low-maintenance trees as long as they are properly sited and planted. Just about every type of conifer likes an open, sunny location. They require consistent watering, but they aren’t crazy about heavy clay soils. Good ventilation and drainage helps prevent some of the fungal diseases that can plague conifers. Some cold-loving conifers, such as firs, hemlocks and spruces, are starting to struggle a bit in the mid-Atlantic region as we experience increasingly warm winters and even hotter summers. The best time to plant or move a coniferous tree or shrub is late summer or early fall. Conifers usually do not require heavy pruning except for those grown as formal hedges. Light pruning of most evergreens – except for pines and spruce – is best done in late winter/early spring before new growth starts. Pines and spruce should be pruned in mid-summer, after the season’s growth has been completed but before stem tissues harden off. Fertilizing should be done very sparingly; too much fertilizer will cause conifers to produce too much growth too quickly, often resulting in an excess of sap that will attract pests and diseases. Conifers typically have shallow root systems, so they appreciate mulching with composted leaves every autumn. One note about blue spruce: do not use insecticidal soap or horticultural oil on this variety of spruce. The reason it is “blue” is that it has a waxy substance that gives it its bluish-silver cast; soaps and oils will strip this wax off the needles. It’s harmless, but your “blue” spruce will be green for at least a season or two!

Next week: Starting Seeds

(c) 2006 – Kathleen Franklin, All Rights Reserved. Kathleen is a county-certified Master Gardener and a longtime employee of a local garden nursery. To ask a question or to schedule a garden consultation, contact kfranklin@potomacnet.com

Buxus microphylla | Littleleaf Boxwood

image Buxus microphylla image Buxus microphylla leaves image Buxus microphylla image Buxus fastigiata image Buxus americana 'Green Towers' image Buxus 'Dee Runk'

image Buxus microphylla

Buxus microphylla | Littleleaf Boxwood

STRENGTHS
Evergreen, traditional and lovely.  Wonderful specimen or aristocratic hedge. Gives an evergreen structure to a garden. Can be pruned in any shape, round, rectangular, animal topiary, often used in formal gardens.  

CARE
Easily transplanted. Prospers in climates that do not have extreme summer heat or winter cold. Prune in late winter. Adaptable, prefers limestone soils pH 6 or greater.
image Buxus microphylla 'Green Velvet'
NOTES
New growth extremely sensitive to winter injury – never prune in August when there is no time for cold hardening. Likes the sun so if you have too shady a spot, try Ilex crenata as an alternative.
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Green Beauty’ 3′/ 3′ in 10 years, easygoing ringer for English box (readily available)
‘var. koreana x B. sempervirens hybrids’ handsome and valuable group of boxwoods, compact and hardy with nice color of sempervirens
‘Winter Beauty’ 3’ to 4’, mounded dark green
‘Winter Gem’ 2’ tall, velvety green
‘Green Ice’ 3’/ 3’ extremely hardy, glossy (says Dirr)
‘Green Mountain’ 5’/ 3’, pyramidal, upright (readily available)
‘Green Velvet’ 4’/ 4’, pretty leaves (readily available)

www.washingtonpost.com article in home section 1.11.07 mentions the following Boxwoods…
‘John Baldwin’ 10′/ 3.5′ in 25 yrs, fine leaf, pretty sillouette
‘Varder Valley’ 2′/ 3′ in 15 yrs low spreader, blue cast
‘Green Beauty’
‘Elegantissima’ 3′/ 2′ in 15 yrs, creamy edges and the best variagated
‘Dee Runk’ 9′/ 2′ in 15 yrs ($$$) good for small hedge (small ones available)
‘Justin Brouwers’ 2′/2.5′ in 10 yrs, a fixture at the white house (readily available at Evergro and Merrifield)

ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 7 – 9 | full sun to moderate shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow, slower than sempervirens
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 3’ to 4’ / 3’ to 4’

PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. rounded, multiple branching, open or dense depending on the cultivar
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1/3” – 1”, ovate to lance shape
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, opposite
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | medium green | New growth | emerges light green and waxy (while sempervirens emerges flat blue-green)
image Buxus microphylla 'Green Beauty'FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS
| delicate March-April, male has occasional petals

NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL prefers moist, but extrememly well drained, hates wet feet
Native to Eastern Asia

www.boxwoodsociety.org

UCONN plant database/Buxus microphylla

MO Botanical Garden/Buxus microphylla

Saunders Brothers / Justin Brouwers

d*d flickr

image 'Dee Runk'

‘Dee Runk’ above, wonderful but $$$

image 'Justin Brouwers'

‘Justin Brouwers’ above and below, cute isn’t it?

image 'Justin Brouwers' image 'Justin Brouwers' Boxwood

Looking Out for Our Feathered-Friends

::::::::::: GUEST BLOGGER :::::::::::

Looking Out For Our Feathered-Friends
By Kathleen Franklin (kfranklin@potomacnet.com)

The birds in our area certainly haven’t suffered this winter, what with record high temperatures and ample rainfall. Here are ways to encourage avian diversity in your backyard even in winter.

First, clean feeders and birdhouses. Birdseed – particularly seed left at the bottom of tube and tray feeders – gets moldy. The best cleaning method is a solution of 50 percent HOT water and 50 percent white vinegar. Let the feeder dry completely before refilling. Same goes for unoccupied bird houses. Purge leftover nesting materials from last spring and summer, unless you spot evidence of active nest-building.

Second, place feeders at least eight feet from your house if you want to see shyer birds, such as Carolina wren, black-capped chickadee, nuthatch, tufted titmouse, or – if you’re really lucky – Eastern bluebird. Use feeders that have squirrel-deterring mechanisms, and make sure the feeder is near an evergreen shrub or tree to provide some shelter.

Third, buy good birdseed. Most seed at hardware and grocery stores is “junk food” for birds. It’s cheap, but it’s full of fillers that don’t provide much nourishment and create an unholy mess under your feeders. These low-end seeds often produce unwanted weeds in your lawn and garden once they drop from the feeder or work their way through birds’ digestive systems. Opt instead for “cleaner” seed varieties, such as sunflower hearts, which won’t leave shells everywhere. These seeds – irradiated to prevent sprouting – are well worth the extra cost at stores that cater to bird enthusiasts.

Plus, cheaper seed (often packaged as “mixed” or “songbird” seed) is a feast for sparrows, which are notorious feeder hogs. Sparrows are non-native invasive birds and are not protected under the migratory bird laws. They take over nests of native cavity-nesters and chase them away from feeders.

The more varied your seed and feeder types, the more variety of birds you’ll see. Suet feeders, for example, attract woodpeckers and sapsuckers. Niger (thistle) seed attracts finches. Robins, bluebirds, and cardinals love raisins. Orioles love grape jelly and other fruity snacks. Nuthatches like mealworms, available at birdseed stores. Most birds also like salt, so leave out a salt block. Plant a variety of fruit/berry-bearing trees and shrubs (away from sidewalks and paths to reduce mess) to attract even more birds.

Don’t forget water. Birdbaths should be no more than three inches deep and have rough edges to help birds maintain traction while drinking (plastic and glass are too slippery.) Never use chemicals to clean birdbaths; scrub out regularly with just a touch of bleach. In summer, drop in a “Mosquito Dunk” (a commercially available organic repellent) to prevent mosquitoes from breeding in the water.

Next week: Tips on Caring for Jade Plants

© 2006 – Kathleen Franklin, All Rights Reserved. Kathleen is a county-certified Master Gardener and a longtime employee of a local garden nursery. To ask a question or to schedule a garden consultation, contact kfranklin@potomacnet.com

Aucuba japonica | Aucuba

image Aucuba leaves image Aucuba shrub image Aucuba stem image Aucuba leaf image Aucubab large shrub

image Aucuba shrub

Aucuba japonica | Aucuba

STRENGTHS
Evergreen that adds light to dark and shady spaces. Glossy, speckled leaves that emulate dappled light. Looks nice in lush borders. Used extensively in the South. Great for privacy hedge. Great in shade.

CARE
Carefree plant. Keep pruned at 5’ – 8’ to avoid leggyness. Prune leaves that aren’t speckled.
image Aucuba stem

NOTES
Site in shade and for winter protection. Tolerates pollution extremely well. Works well in zone 7. Young leaves can blacken from too much sun exposure. Dioecious – needs male nearby for females to berry. Very difficult to get that info at a nursery because the males don’t berry. Must request combo.
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Gold Dust’ not my favorite
‘Rozzannie’ perfect flowers, large bright berries in absence of male, slow hard to find

ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 7 – 10 | full sun to full shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow, but faster with water and fertilizer
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6’ to 10’

PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Densley upright, rounded, tidy
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″ to 8″/ 1.5″-2″wide, acute, some forms have narrow leaves, some are uniformly green, some have more serration
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, opposite
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | lustrous deep dark bluish green, many speckled and variegated
image Aucuba

FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | delicate March-April, male has occasional petals
BERRIES | beautiful bright red, centimeter, oval
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL prefers moist well drained, known to grow under beeches, lindens and chestnuts where grass will not grow, tolerates polluted sites extremely well.
Native to Japan

Paghat’s Garden / Aucuba japonica

NC State / Aucuba japonica

Ilex cornuta | Chinese Holly

image Ilex cornuta 'Burfordii'
above – ‘Burfordii’

Ilex cornuta | Chinese Holly
STRENGTHS
Evergreen. Robust leaved Holly. Very adaptable and distinguished shrub. Makes an impenitrable hedge to protect you against unfriendly neighbors. It’s really not a plant I have any affection for but I can see it’s utility. I much prefer the native American Holly Ilex opaca. But, many people love Chinese Hollies. There are at least 100 (probably more) cultivars. ‘Burfordii’ has a nice shape and simpler leaves than some. ‘O. Spring’, with tri-colored leaves is actually quite lovely in the right setting.

MY BAD ATTITUDE ABOUT HOLLIES
My bad attitude about hollies comes from the fact that many outgrow their homes and overwhelm and sometimes obliterate whatever is close by. Often planted as screens in tight spaces, when a much less burly plant would be better. Once overgrown, it is a project to remove them. They can be very nice when treated as small trees, given space and allowed to take on a more natural state. I like hollies pruned up as well to expose the branching. Also, the shinier the leaf, the more fake they look to me.  Therefore I’m not a fan of Ilex cornuta.  Of large leaved hollies, my favorite is the native Ilex opaca. I do not have a bad attitude about small leaved hollies, on the contrary. Ilex crenata or Ilex vomitoria are fabulous.
image Ilex cornuta

CARE
Transfer B&B if root trimmed. Heat and drought tolerant. Prune to shape in early spring just before new growth begins. Needs minimal pruning as a hedge, but may be sheared regularly to neaten hedge.
NOTES
Dioecious, needs male for female to produce berries. Extremely heat and drought tollerant. Occasionally developes a nitrogen deficiency, symptoms are yellow yeaves. Also, sometimes gets scale.
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Bufordii’ dense rounded/pyramidal up to 20′ high, leaves have only 1 spike
‘Burfordii Nana’ dwarf form, shrub doesn’t berry as heavily
‘O. Spring’ 10′ high mustard yellow, dark and light green leaves

image Ilex cornutaZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE …..
8 – 9 | full sun to part shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 20’ to 40’ (great variation)
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. rounded, dense, multi-stemed
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. sturdy, sharp spine, rounded or rectangular, have a unique shape – the central spine points down, while the next two point up like horns (hence the name cornuta, which means horned). Many Chinese Hollies lack these horns.
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | Glossy dark green
image Ilex cornuta stems
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
BARK | smooth, gray with size becoming very finely flakey
BERRIES | bright red, showy, appears in fall gives winter interest
FLOWERS | hidden dainty 6 part tiny white flower with yellow center
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL grows in wet to medium wet. Can tolerate drought, though. Adaptable to light and heavy clay.
Native to east Asia

Floridata | Ilex cornuta ‘Burfordii’
VA Tech Dendrology | Ilex cornuta
Duke | Ilex cornuta


image Ilex cornuta 'O. Spring' leaves
image Ilex cornuta 'O. Spring'

Ilex glabra | Inkberry

IMG_5167.JPG
Ilex glabra | Inkberry

STRENGTHS
Evergreen Native. Light airy texture with dense slender leaves and rounded habit. One of my favorite leaves. Use in borders, foundations or woodland garden near ponds or streams. Good even for tough urban territory. Can create a very nice hedge. May be used as substitute for Ilex crenata for something more unusual in a residential landscape to naturalize.

CARE
Transfer B&B if root trimmed. Heat and drought tolerant. Prune to shape in early spring just before new growth begins. Needs minimal pruning as a hedge, but may be sheared regularly to form a lower growing hedge. It can be cut back severely for rejuvenation when it begins to get leggy. Prone to breakage under heavy ice.

NOTES
Dioecious, needs male for female to produce jet black berries. Spreads by rhizomes. id: only a few uneven serrations on upper half of narrow smallish leaf, normal sp. leaves grow only on top 1/3rd of plant which can be very good for spots where visibility counts or you want to underplant. Not too expensive.
IMG_1010.JPG IMG_1011.JPG

above is ‘Densa’ at Greensprings Gardens in VA
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Compacta’ dense 3′ to 4′/4′ to 6′ shrub (haven’t seen this one yet)
‘Shamrock’ 1/2 the normal size, compact and has leaves that grow farther down the plant than normal (50%)
‘Nordic’ an especially cold tolerant male variety that grows to 4′ tall and retains a tighter form
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 5 – 8 | part sun to full shade (likes shade best)
GROWTH RATE ….. slow
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 4’ to 8’ / 20’ to 40’ (great variation)
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. rounded, dense, multi-stemed
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. spineless narrow obvate 1.5″ x ½”, sturdy.
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | lustrous dark green fades to olive in winter

FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
BARK | smooth, dark greenish brown
BERRIES | jet black, showy, appears in fall gives winter interest, attracts bird
FLOWERS | hidden dainty 6 part tiny white flower with yellow center
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL grows in wet to medium wet. Can tolerate drought, though. Adaptable to light and heavy clay.
Native to the pine flatwoods of the eastern and south-central US. Not happy with salt so stear clear of concrete.

MO Botanical Garden | Ilex glabra

VA Tech Dendronolgy | Ilex glabra

Duke | Ilex glabra



IMG_5157.JPG

below right Ilex glabra ‘Shamrock’, next to another colutivar on left.
IMG_5006.JPG
IMG_5166.JPG

Next Page »