Archive for the 'native' Category

Magnolia grandiflora | Southern Magnolia

Magnolia grandiflora.

bloom by Greg Miles.                                      tree by Clemson HGIC Photos

DESCRIPTION | native, softly pyramidal, evergreen tree

SIZE | 30′ – 50′ tall

FLOWER | 5″ with large cupped petals, white or creamy white, lemon or vanilla fragrance, blooms in summer

NOTES | 3″, furry seed pods with beautiful bright orange red berries in fall.  nice but smaller cultivars: ‘Teddy Bear’, ‘Alta’

Fothergilla gardenii | Dwarf Fothergilla

Fothergilla gardenii | above photo: Jennifer Benner

Fothergilla gardenii | above photo: Jennifer Benner

IMG_6802.JPG IMG_9691.JPG

DESCRIPTION | Native, deciduous woodland shrub

SIZE | 5′ – 6′ tall, sometimes not as large

FLOWER | 1″ white, fragrant, sometimes appearing before leaves

NOTES | wonderful fall color

SCARY | invasive grasses of the Mid Atlantic

Oh no!!!!! This calls for lots of exclamation points. Please don’t use these invasives. They ARE attractive, but the typical Zebra Grass (aka Chinese Silver Grass) is invasive in the Mid-Atlantic:
Miscanthus sinensis ‘Little Zebra’
Miscanthus sinensis Anderss
Miscanthus sinensis, the species

check it out…http://dnr.state.il.us/Stewardship/CD/midatlantic/misi.html

Other bad boys include:
Pennisetum alopecuroides
Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Hamelm’

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Alternative non-invasive grasses include:

Carex grayii and other sedges [native = bonus points]
has amazing medieval looking flowers

Molinia caerulea
Digging Dog Nursery has a good selection

Muhlenbergia capillaris

Panicum virgatum ‘Cloud Nine’ [native = bonus points]

Panicum virgatum ‘Prairie Fire’

Cornus florida | American Dogwood

Cornus florida | American Dogwood

IMG_6767.JPGCHARACTER
Native to MD and the East Coast Piedmont woodlands, yes, I admit that I love them. I can’t help it. They were everywhere in Atlanta where I grew up and definitely have a southern charm.  Dogwoods are so happy. Their upturned swooping branching habit creates the illusion of floating blossoms when they bloom in April before the folliage. They are at home in almost any type of landscape design, formal and informal. They look great in mass or as a focal point specimen. I’ve even seen them used succesfully as a screen.
CARE

Dogwoods should be planted in shade, since they are an understory tree.  This is very important to successful growing conditions and preventing undue stress which could make them suseptible to disease.  Dogwoods have been famously suffering from an “anthracnose” in recent years which can kill a healthy tree in a couple of seasons.  The first noticeable symptoms are when leaves turn fall color and drop early, even in July.  If you see this begin to happen while it is only affecting a few leaves, you still have a chance of preventing the disease from taking over completely, but you must act by cleaning up any fallen leaves and removing any new water sprouts which tend to spread the disease.  There are many good articles on this topic.  Here is one from Clemson.
IMG_7056.JPG

IMG_6717.JPG

IMG_1740.JPG

NOTES
The name “dogwood” may have been originated from the Gaelic term “dag”, a pointed tool used to punch leather or meat. Another possibility comes from England. Years ago, people there used the bark of the bloodtwig dogwood (Cornus sanguinea) to bathe mangy dogs. On this continent, flowering dogwood has been used by Native Americans to make scarlet dyes and tinctures. Although the fruits are poisonous to humans, in the late 1700s, colonists made a tea from dogwood bark to reduce fevers and soothe colds. The wood of the dogwood tree is used today to make small tools and ornaments. It has been under cultivation in North America since the 1730s. Today, flowering dogwoods are popular landscaping trees. They are slow growing (often only a few centimeters per year in dense shade), resilient, and beautiful.

RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Cherokee Cheif’ available, heavy fruiting 15′ tall
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 5 – 9 | full sun to full shade
GROWTH RATE ….. medium
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 20′-30′/7′ to 15′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Loose, rounded; many horizontal and ascending branches
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ obovate, impressed veins, obtusely serrated, thin, light
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | dark green, turning bright orange and soft red in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | small white in spring
BERRIES | beautiful bright orange red

NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL does well in moist to dry and slightly alkaline
Native MD to FL and west to TX

Sustainable Woodland Path | dogwood*design project

IMG_9985.JPG, originally uploaded by dogwood*designer.

DESIGNER
Adele Medina O’Dowd, principal, dogwood*design, llc
contact me | adele@willowlandscapedesign.net or 202.255.0728
references available upon request

before
GARDEN CHARACTER

This little stretch of earth was once lined in dying bamboo, but has now been rejuvenated and reclaimed as a lovely passageway between Chevy Chase West’ Hunt Avenue and Drummond Avenue. The big problem here was water and drainage since possibly a couple hundred commuters and school children take this route through the neighborhood each day. The bottom of the of the pass was always flooding in heavy rain since it had a very low spot.

Once the bamboo was removed and tilled out of the ground, a great spot as left for a garden. But since this land is community property and therefore no on in particular is responsible for it’s upkeep except willing neighbors, dogwood*design was charged with designing a plan that would be sustainable and a pleasure to see each day and with seasonal interest.

PLANTS
Planted here are purple Beautyberries, native Virginia Sweetspire ‘Henry’s Garnet’ and Spicebush, as well as tall growing evergreens Aucuba japonica and Leatherleaf viburnum. Two trees adorn the spot now, a light green needled evergreen Limber Pine and a very showy deciduous Chinese Fringetree with it’s exfoliating bark and lacy white spring plums.

Hope you have a chance to pass by and enjoy this sustainable community bright spot.

IMG_9989.JPGIMG_9471.JPG

IMG_9986.JPGIMG_9997.JPG

IMG_9987.JPG IMG_9992.JPG

CCW Path Plan.jpg

Entrance Garden | Landscape Design Ideas

my garden, originally uploaded by intheburg.

Entrance Garden | Landscape Design Ideas

This wonderful entrance belongs to my landscape architect friend who lives in Richmond, VA. The entrance to the house on a shady wooded lot has so many personal touches that you can check out by looking at his flickr set. He has created a beautiful woodland garden to fit.  I love the way it all works together. I know he likes native plants and see a little Lizard’s Tail, featured along with pitcher plant, big leaf magnolia and Carolina Spider Lady.

The water feature is serene and reflect the color of the pots in early spring as well as the plants later on. The colors here in total are very simple cool greens and warm brick reds, softened with moss all over. Ferns are used for groundcover instead of grass. I really like the climbing hydrangea that provides just a little bit of a screen and a lot of flow as you amble down the front walk. Most of the other plants next to the front walk are low so you don’t feel crouded as you make your approach to the front door. But why stop there? The easy going patio table is just a few steps more. You get to pass the soft organic sculpture on the way. All of this is very doable and fits right into the suburban Piedmont environment.

Cladrastis kentukea | Yellowwood

IMG_7317.JPG, originally uploaded by dogwood*designer.

Cladrastis kentukea | Yellowwood

Yellowwood is a small tree, with yellow wood on the inside of the bark. The outside is very light gray. It has zero pest problems and is native. It’s pretty bloom racines dangle in late May when not much else is blooming. This versitile tree can even be good neighbors with black walnuts. It’s an unusual (underused) choice. The very simple folliage is a lot like Kerria japonica, and can be id’d because it is alternate while K. japonica is opposite.

Podophyllum peltatum | Mayapple

IMG_7109.JPG, originally uploaded by dogwood*designer.

Podophyllum peltatum | Mayapple

Mayapple is a cool native groundcover, which has little yellow flowers and an actual apple that hangs down below the leaves, believe it or not. It doesn’t stick around long, gone by June. Though this pinwheel is known to be a bit aggressive.

The Great Viburnum List

IMG_7508.JPG

[above Viburnum opulus 'Compactus' | European Cranberry Bush]

Viburnum ssp | Viburnum

Ok Ray, you asked for this. Here is my list of Viburnums for all occasions. I hope to add to this list over time since there are so many to choose from and something for any garden circumstance. So when I have to dig deep to find the right plant, I will know to start here at this list. They are together here in one post so we can compare them easily.
CHARACTER
At home in the Northern hemisphere of the world, it’s difficult to describe this genus as a group since their traits are varried depending on species and cultivar. Generally, in the Mid-Atlantic, Viburnum is evergreen or at least semi-evergreen, adaptable but great in light shade, and have hydrangea-like blooms many with fragrance or berries. When I picture Viburnum in my head, I think of leathery down turned rhododendron-like leaves, but in fact their folliage can be quite different so it’s good to get to know the cultivars you like on a personal basis. Still the qualites listed above make them a versital standard for any garden. If you can’t figure out what would be a good plant to use for a specific need, turn to Viburnums before you get frustrated.

CARE
Easy to care for but many need and or benefit from annual pruning, especially the more woody larger ones. Occassionally effected by aphids or nematodes (in the south), but no serious problems on the whole.
NOTES
150 species of shrubs and small trees. The blooms are called corymbs and look like round pom poms or flatter landing pads. Selective or tip prune, don’t shear.
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 5 – 9 | full sun to part shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow to medium
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL likes well drained acid soil. but very adaptable
Native all over northern hemisphere of the world

LINKS
dogwood*design on Flickr / pics in Viburnum set
Dave’s Garden / Viburnum comments on many cultivars

MO Botanical Garden / Doublefile Viburnum


RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO

IMG_6871.JPG

Viburnum x burkwoodii ‘Mohawk’ | Burkwood Viburnum [above]
I WOULD use this cultivar, but my teacher says he wouldn’t because it’s not too exicting past bloom time. Nice specimen at Greensprings Garden in VA. Has really great soft pink emerging from tight wine colored buds.
USE FOR ….. good for woodland or contemporary garden, borders, in mass
HARDINESS ….. zones 4 to 8, hardiest of the pom pom frangrant cultivars
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 5′ to 6′, maybe smaller than other V. dilatatums
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. open, multi-stemmed, nice branching habit, never as dense as V. x juddii or V. carlesii
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1″-3″ spear or almost heart shaped, soft fuzzy, grooved viens
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | medium green, somewhat shiney, sporadic red in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 5″, pale pink white pom poms, 10 days in May to June
FLORETS | many, spicey soft fragrance
BERRIES | cool shiney yellow Sept to Dec, heavy racimes

IMG_0777.JPG

Viburnum dilatatum
‘Michael Dodge’ | Linden Viburnum [above]
I WOULD use this cultivar, but may not be as available as other Viburnums. Nice specimen at Greensprings Garden in VA. Has really tremendously beautiful shiney yellow berries.
USE FOR ….. good for woodland or contemporary garden, borders
HARDINESS ….. zones 5 to 7, leaves hold late, better with some shade in Mid-Atlantic
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 5′ to 6′, maybe smaller than other V. dilatatums
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. open, but full of folliage, can get a bit leggy
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-5″ rounded, grooved veins like others, leathery
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | medium green, somewhat shiney, coppery tinged in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 5″, creamy white, flat landing pads covering the plant, 10 days in May to June
FLORETS | many
BERRIES | cool shiney yellow Sept to Dec, heavy berry show

Viburnum ‘Chesapeake’ | Chesapeake Viburnum
listed in Dirr as a cultivar under V. utile | Service Viburnum
developed at US Arboretum, I WOULD use, looks good against walls
USE FOR ….. more formal, old southern, romantic setting
HARDINESS ….. Not as hardy as ‘Eskimo’
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′/10′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. compact, mounded, wide
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ spear shaped, leathery, wavy
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | dark green, turning bright yellow in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″, round balls dark pink buds openning to showy white, peak mid April, nice fragrance
FLORETS | 65 per flower
BERRIES | dull red to black

IMG_6901.JPG

Viburnum ‘Conoy’ | Conoy Viburnum [above]
listed in Dirr as a cultivar under V. utile | Service Viburnum
developed at US Arboretum, I probably won’t use, it’s fine but I like others
I prefer ‘Chesapeake’ because of fragrance, Conoy is also too uniform for me
USE FOR ….. more formal, old southern, romantic setting
HARDINESS ….. Not as hardy as ‘Eskimo’
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′/10′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. spreading, mounded, wide
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ spear shaped, leathery, wavy
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | glossy dark green, turning maroon in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″, round balls dark pink buds openning to showy white, peak mid April, mildly fragrant
FLORETS | 75 per flower
BERRIES | dull red to black

IMG_6907.JPG

Viburnum
‘Eskimo’ | Eskimo Viburnum [above]
listed in Dirr as a cultivar under V. utile | Service Viburnum
developed at US Arboretum, I WOULD use
Eskimo has really nice little ball blooms packed with florets but no fragrance
USE FOR ….. more formal, old southern, romantic setting
HARDINESS ….. hardiest of US Arboretum hybrids
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′ to 8′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. compact, stretched mounded, super dense
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ spear shaped, flat, not wavey like others
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | glossy dark green, turning bright yellow in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 4″, round balls dark pink buds openning to showy white, peak later April, no frangrance
FLORETS | 80 to 120 florets per flower, “show stoppers” says Dirr
BERRIES | dull red to black

IMG_0973.JPG

Viburnum nudum ‘Winterthur’ | Winterthur Viburnum aka Smooth Witherod [above]
listed in Dirr with Viburnum cassinoides | Witherrod Viburnum.
I Will use, if I can find, especially this cultivar. The very lustrous green and red leaf color is really a treat in the fall.
USE FOR ….. Good for screens, or specimen in border or woodland setting
HARDINESS ….. does well in Mid-Atlantic
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 5′ to 6′, medium to slow growing
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. compact, rounded, full, dense
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3.5″-4.5″/.75″ tp 2.5″ eliptical with point, very smooth but veins still a bit grooved
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | almost waxy bronze to chocolate when emerging, turning bright green, even more smooth than V. cassinoides
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 2″ to 5″, landing pads, white with yellow stamens in June to July
FLORETS | many
BERRIES | wonderful feature, turning from green to pink to red to blue and finally black, many colors seen simultanously

IMG_7509.JPG
Viburnum opulus | European Cranberry Bush Viburnum [above]
Similar 3 lobed leaves to Viburnum trilobum | American Cranberry Bush and Viburnum sargentii | Sargent Viburnum.
I WOULD use, I need to learn more about the cultivars but there is one listed ‘Nanum’, only 24″ that I will seek out.
USE FOR ….. Great for screens, on large residential, park or comercial landscapes
HARDINESS ….. zonese 3 – 8
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 8′ to 10′, spreading
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. upright, multi-stemmed, arching branches formes thicket
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-4″, tri-lobed with soft serration
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium to bright green, new growth tinged with red, really nice like maple
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 2″ to 4″, landing pads white in May
FLORETS | white outer ring with fertile inner, creating a lovely “pinwheel effect” says Dirr
BERRIES | showy red in Sept-Oct, birds love, shrivle to raisons in winter

IMG_7735.JPG

IMG_7729.JPG

Viburnum plicatum var tomentosum
| Doublefile Viburnum [both above]
I WOULD this sometimes, can get kinda large, so pick small sized cultivars. Some including ‘Mariesii’ are not sterile, be careful with this one. Some, including ‘Shasta’ are sterile and won’t spread. Great bird food.
USE FOR ….. elegant, strong architecture, fatastic blooms both pom poms and landing pads depending on cultivar.
HARDINESS ….. zones 3 to 7, perfect for Mid-Atlantic
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 8′ to 10′, slowish, lives 45 years
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. tiered horizontal branching, with long spires, ID by this, unique look for Viburnum
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-4″ rounded with very pointy tip, serrate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium green, impressed viens
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 5″, white pom poms, but mostly landing pads, depending
FLORETS | many, no fragrance
BERRIES | egg shaped, bright red, friuts early June to August

IMG_1083.JPG

Viburnum prunifolium | Blackhaw Viburnum [above]
I WOULD use, especially nice as a small tree. It has striking dark purplish leaves so needs either open space or light green for best contrast and to make it stand out. Does well in dry soil, too.
USE FOR ….. good for woodland or formal, alone or in mass, handsome
HARDINESS ….. zones 3 to 9, sun or shade, adaptable to soil
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 12′ to 20′, slow to medium
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. multi-stemmed or single, rounded outline but “stiffly branched”, shape and brnches look a bit like a Hawthorne
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3.5″ eleptical spear, course
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | dark green, smooth, red to purple brighter in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 2″ to 4″, creamy white landing pads
FLORETS | many
BERRIES | pinkish rose drupe changing to blueish black, etible, tastes pretty good at least the Colonists liked it

IMG_6914.JPG

Viburnum x pragense | Prague Viburnum [Prague above right, Eskimo left]
listed in Dirr as related to V. rhytidophyllum | Leatherleaf Viburnum
I WOULD use, sparingly I guess although because you can have too much of this good thing.
Supposed to be extremely hardy, yes from Prague the city.
USE FOR ….. Good for screens, only in extra-large residential, park or comercial landscapes
HARDINESS ….. super hardy to -17 degrees
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 10′ to 15′, fast growing, spreading
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. woody, full
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″-7″ largest, narrow spear shaped
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | lustrous dark green, new growth soft and soft on bottom
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 4″, landing pads start pink to brown to white
FLORETS | 100+ florets per flower, warm smelling
BERRIES | dull red to black

IMG_7885.JPGViburnum rhytidophyllum | Leatherleaf Viburnum [above]
I probably WON’T use, has eaten my neighbor’s back yard. We will try to most of it out but it is indeed a successful screen, but looks kinda droopy most of the time.
USE FOR ….. Good for screens, only in extra-large residential, park or comercial landscapes
HARDINESS ….. super hardy to -17 degrees
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 10′ to 15′, fast growing, spreading
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. woody, leggy, rounded outline, multi-stemmed
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″-7″ largest, very narrow spear shaped
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | lduller green, strongly grooved
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 4″, landing pads start pink to brown to white, the brown is down right dingy looking
FLORETS | 100+ florets per flower
BERRIES | dull red to black

Chionanthus virginicus | Fringe Tree

IMG_7357.JPG

above Chionanthus retusus blooms, closely related to the native version

Chionanthus virginicus | Fringe Tree

CHARACTER
Native to MD and the east coast piedmont and accross to the mid-west, found wild in the woods or available at the nursery. This is a versital tree, a good pick for a variety of circulmstances. Open and airy branching with very showy, fringey blooms that have a lovely spicey scent. The native Fringe Tree is smaller than its Asian cousin, Chionanthus retusus | Chinese Fringe Tree which is also beautiful with gorgeous exfoliating bark with denser folliage. Both have graceful branches and like to live on the edges peaking into the sun from the shadey side. Good in mass or alone.

CARE
Basically problem free – EASY. This one is for you, if you don’t want to do any maintenance. Can be pruned if it becomes leggy.
NOTES
Dioecious – you need both, but both flower. Males slightly more showy. Blooms in late May to June when not much else is blooming, good for transition.
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
Cultivars (vs liberating one from the wild) will produce nicer plants in general, not surprisingly, but the distinctions between those available at the nursery aren’t significant. Any Fringe Tree will do.

IMG_7348.JPG

IMG_7350.JPG
Chionanathus retusus | Chinese Fringe Tree (above)
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 20′-30′/same
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Upright, spreading and rounded but more dense than C. retusus
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-6″ rounded, sometimes with point
FLOWERS | white fringey long 1″ long petals, lacey, lasts 2 weeks
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | darker green, glossier green
BARK ….. outstanding exfoliating exfoliating

IMG_7356.JPG
IMG_7364.JPG
Chionanathus viginicus | Fringe Tree (above)
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 10′ to 15′ /8′ to 12′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Loose, rounded; many horizontal and ascending branches, single or multi-stemmed, small tree or large shrub, fountain-like outline, folliage at end of stems
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2.5″to 6″ spear shaped, narrow
FLOWERS | white fringey long 2″ long petals, lacey, lasts a month
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium green, a bit duller than C. retusus
STEM ….. squarish, brown with prominant lenticils, but basically smooth

BOTH
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 7 – 9 | full sun to full shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow to medium
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, opposite
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FALL COLOR | soft yellow
FRUIT | insignificant, small drupes of blue in September

NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL prefers deep moist, well drained, but very adaptable, in the wild found along streams
C. viginicus native MD, NJ to FL and west to TX
C. retusus native to Asia but well suited to east coast and not invasive
IMG_7346.JPG
MO Botanical Gardens / Chionanthus viginicus

Dave’s Garden / Chionanthus virginicus

MO Botanical Gardens / Chionanthus retusus

Dave’s Garden / Chionanthus retusus

Flickr / dogwood*design / Chionanthus pics

Next Page »