Archive for the 'shrubs | deciduous' Category

Fothergilla gardenii | Dwarf Fothergilla

Fothergilla gardenii | above photo: Jennifer Benner

Fothergilla gardenii | above photo: Jennifer Benner

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DESCRIPTION | Native, deciduous woodland shrub

SIZE | 5′ – 6′ tall, sometimes not as large

FLOWER | 1″ white, fragrant, sometimes appearing before leaves

NOTES | wonderful fall color

Seasonal Planting Appeal | Landscape Design Ideas

IMG_1023.JPG, originally uploaded by dogwood*designer.

Seasonal Planting Appeal | Landscape Design Ideas

Working with temporal elements in a garden can be pretty fun and remind people of the natural changes we all experience. This very cool bench and handmade arbor at Green Spring Gardens in Fairfax, VA is covered in Celastrus scandens | American Bittersweet, a Virginia native made charming because of it’s relationship to this place to sit. Celastrus scandens has terrific berries in the fall but even in winter, you can see how the vine, seat and abor almst become one (formerly) organic element. Other perennials and bulbs nearby add color in spring. There is only one little lonely evergreen in the vacinity, there to “support” the slightly leaning arbor. A loose stone path and low wall also help. Sitting here you can get really up close and personal with the passing of time.

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Syringa vulgaris | Lilac

IMG_7152.JPG, originally uploaded by dogwood*designer.

Syringa vulgaris | Lilac

Lilac can look a little shabby up close, but stand back and let yourself succomb to naustalgia and the wonderful fragrances. Grandma loves purple and I hate to admit it, but so do I. One third of entire plant should be pruned to the ground each year to keep it vigorous. Don’t be kind, take the biggest branches. Your cruelty will pay off. If you have Lilac, powdery mildew will be part of your life. It covers the plant but doesn’t really hurt it. But maybe it’s not a good idea near hydrangea.

Spiraea bumalda ‘Goldflame’ | Goldflame Spirea

IMG_7078.JPG, originally uploaded by dogwood*designer.

Spiraea bumalda ‘Goldflame’ | Goldflame Spirea

Oh my gosh this stuff is beautiful, the chartreuse folliage with the warm red new growth makes me feel good. It works in dry-ish soil, but best to cut it back every 2 years to 6″ high. Watch out for aphids and and powdery mildew.

Other cultivars are ‘Limemound’ which doesn’t have any red; and ‘Anthony Waterer’ which has dark green folliage with white and pink mottling.

Lonicera x heckrotti | Goldflame Honeysuckle

IMG_7511.JPG, originally uploaded by dogwood*designer.

Lonicer x heckrotti | Goldflame Honeysuckle

Goldflame is not the aggressive plant that it’s sister, Lonicera japonica, is. I wonder if you can sip the nectar. Either way, it’s quite pretty and can be planted to use as a small bush as well as a vine. I have one in my yard that has taken a 3 years to get going, actually, but it seems to be gaining strength.

Weigela florida ‘Variegata’ | Old fahsioned Weigela

IMG_7765.JPG, originally uploaded by dogwood*designer.

Weigela florida | Old Fashioned Weigela

An old-fashioned beauty, especially this particular variegated cultivar with variegated leaves. The multicolored blooms can brighten up a shadey corner. You can even put it at the front of your yard by the road to welcome your guests.

These beauties are VERY drought tolerant, almost like a sedum, and so qualifies as “sustainable”.  See this great article by my colleague, Susan Harris.

Deutzia gracilis | Slendar Deutzia

IMG_7759.JPG, originally uploaded by dogwood*designer.

Deutzia gracilis | Slender Deutzia

This is so pretty. I’ll definiately be using this in my shade garden. Chartreuse leaves pop up through white blooms in May.

Top 10 Rhododendrons | Rhododendron & Azalea

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[above R. Catawba 'Lee's Dark Purple' available at Merrified and elsewhere, blooms again in fall]
Rhododendron spp.| Rhodies & Azaleas
I don’t actually think it’s possible to have a Top 10, I just said that to get your attention. But here is my list of those I like. I’ll try to keep it reasonable, not too short, not too long but as reliable as possible. In fact there are over 900 species and countless cultivars, improvements have come with hybridization, especially for cold hardiness, so don’t fear change in this case. Rhododendrons and azaleas are indigenous to many parts of the world but grow especially well in the US Piedmont and upper Northwest, as well as In China and Japan.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?
NOTHING. They are all now classified in the same genus so there is no clear distinction for purposes of ID, but there are a few generalisms you can work with (eventhough it doesn’t really matter). Rhododendrons are mostly evergreen, while azaleas are mostly deciduous. Rhododendrons mostly have 9 stamens, while azaleas mostly have 5 – this info is straight from Dirr. It seems to me that rhododendrons have large leaves, while azaleas have small. The truth is that they are now so hybridized that it virtually impossible for experts to tell the difference. So the best thing to do is not distinguish between rhododendrons and azaleas, but between size, color and texture. I will include the name I found each with in the nursery.

CHARACTER
Puny 18 inch midgets to 15 foot giants, all shrubs, many everygreen, especially in the Mid-atlantic. Some people adore them, some abhore because of overuse and loud colors. I’m in the first camp, though, especially for the larger leaved woodlanders. The big flower buds have a creamy frosting texture to me. I love Asian Modern gardens where they are right at home showing off their strong branch architecture. They make great foils for ferns and stone. They are more perky than Viburnums but also more finicky. Still, on the whole very versitile for residential landscapes. Don’t hate them just because they are beautiful.

CARE
Watch out for aphids, though the worst problem seems to be that people plant them from nursery containers which has great soil, straight into a container sized hole in the clay ground. Make the effort when planting to dig a hole 2 to 3 times the width and 1.5 time the depth of the container, then mix clay from the site with a good mix of leaf grow 50/50 and plant very shallow to allow for good drainage and air circulation. Doing this will keep the suffering and death tole down. Then be sure to soak the soil thoroughly once a week till established. Does well with an elevated bed of top soil, since it has very shallow roots. Once established, it doesn’t like to be disturbed. Mulch seasonally 2″ to 3″.

NOTES
In production, growers are pushing plants to their limits so they will look great at the retail nursery, feeding and watering them to get them ready. It reminds me of professinal athlete and steroid use. So watering is very important when you first plant. Don’t place white ones at front door unless you want to pick off the spent blooms.
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL acid lover, REQUIRES good drainage
Native Blueridge Mountains, Carolina, Tennessee
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 4,5 – 8 | part sun to full shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow, once established can be very long lived, 40 years or more
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. (unless noted) Rounded outline, multistemmed, woody reaching branches
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate, all the leaves are thick but I will reserve teh term “leathery” here for the thickest, heaviest
LEAF SIZE ….. for simplicity, I’m going to put the leaves into catagories: tiny=.5″ or less, small=.5 “to 1.5″, medium=1.5″ to 3″, large= 3″ to 6″

LINKS …..
Great list and pictures of specimens some UNC dude grew in his own garden, must be big
Merrifield Nursery in Northern VA Rhododendron and Azalea chart
Wagner Nursery in Oregon has nice photos
dogwood*design Flickr Rhododendron set

RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
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Rhododendron catawbiense | Catawba Rhodie ['Album' above] widely available, long time standard, sometimes referred to as Mnt. Laurel, but that’s NOT what it is.
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′-10′/5′-8′
LEAF SIZE, FORM & SHAPE ….. small, eliptical
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | medium to dark green, uniform
FLOWERS | 2″ lilac, purple, rose or white mid May, single

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‘Del Val White’ azalea [above] available at Merrifield, pretty and frilly
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 4′/4′
LEAF SIZE, FORM & SHAPE ….. large, eliptical, narrow, leathery, heavy
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | dark green, handsome
FLOWERS | pure white, single frilly, girly, March to April

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Encore hybrid series ‘Autumn Amethyst’ or ‘Autumn Royalty’ [above] known for spring AND fall bloom, newish, Ray’s favorite
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 4′/4′
LEAF SIZE, FORM & SHAPE ….. medium, elongated eliptical or spear, soft and fuzzy, leathery but not thick, dark cast in winter
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | medium, spear, similar to Satsuki hybrids
FLOWERS ….. Amethyst to dark pink, large single bloom

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‘Klondyke’ Exbury hybrid [above], available at Merrifield, Bold display, good in woodland or modern styles
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′-8′/4′-6′
LEAF SIZE, FORM & SHAPE ….. medium, spear
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | lighter green with orangey new growth
FLOWERS | single, tangerine orange, ruffled

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‘Macranthra Double’ Indica Type [above], available at Merrifield, compact and dense, good for little spaces, spreading
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 18″-24″/3′
LEAF SIZE, FORM & SHAPE ….. small, spear
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | lighter green, not as thick
FLOWERS | double, large, rose-like bloom, coral-pink, pretty

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R. x ‘Nova Zembla’ available at Merrifield, hardy to -25 and can take more sun than other Rhodies. Cool speckled throat on red, red flowers.
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 4′-5′/4′-7′
LEAF SIZE, FORM & SHAPE ….. large, eliptical
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | dark green
FLOWERS | profuse, single, ruffled, red (NOT hot pink)

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PJM hybrid series ‘Elite’ [above] available at Bluemont Nursery, vigorous, none for it’s terrific hardiness. They are a bit tougher than most. Not my favorite, but could be the only choice for some conditions.
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 4′-6′/4′-7′
LEAF SIZE, FORM & SHAPE ….. medium, eliptical
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | dark green, turning plum in fall, thick
FLOWERS | lavendar purple in April, single

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‘Rosebud’ azalea [above] available at Merrifield, well named! Dave’s Garden has nice pics.
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 2′-3′
LEAF SIZE, FORM & SHAPE ….. small, eliptical
LEAF COLOR ….. Evergreen | lighter green
FLOWERS | clear pink in April to May, double

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‘Silver Sword’ azalea [above], maybe R x kaempferi, has lovely and rare variegated folliage, may not be so hardy, only to the bottom of zone 6, but I’m going to give it a try, cool! Available at Merrifield.
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 4′/3′
LEAF SIZE, FORM & SHAPE ….. small, spear
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | bright green on inside, rimmed with white, pretty
FLOWERS | single, rose to red, largish

The Great Viburnum List

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[above Viburnum opulus 'Compactus' | European Cranberry Bush]

Viburnum ssp | Viburnum

Ok Ray, you asked for this. Here is my list of Viburnums for all occasions. I hope to add to this list over time since there are so many to choose from and something for any garden circumstance. So when I have to dig deep to find the right plant, I will know to start here at this list. They are together here in one post so we can compare them easily.
CHARACTER
At home in the Northern hemisphere of the world, it’s difficult to describe this genus as a group since their traits are varried depending on species and cultivar. Generally, in the Mid-Atlantic, Viburnum is evergreen or at least semi-evergreen, adaptable but great in light shade, and have hydrangea-like blooms many with fragrance or berries. When I picture Viburnum in my head, I think of leathery down turned rhododendron-like leaves, but in fact their folliage can be quite different so it’s good to get to know the cultivars you like on a personal basis. Still the qualites listed above make them a versital standard for any garden. If you can’t figure out what would be a good plant to use for a specific need, turn to Viburnums before you get frustrated.

CARE
Easy to care for but many need and or benefit from annual pruning, especially the more woody larger ones. Occassionally effected by aphids or nematodes (in the south), but no serious problems on the whole.
NOTES
150 species of shrubs and small trees. The blooms are called corymbs and look like round pom poms or flatter landing pads. Selective or tip prune, don’t shear.
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 5 – 9 | full sun to part shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow to medium
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL likes well drained acid soil. but very adaptable
Native all over northern hemisphere of the world

LINKS
dogwood*design on Flickr / pics in Viburnum set
Dave’s Garden / Viburnum comments on many cultivars

MO Botanical Garden / Doublefile Viburnum


RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO

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Viburnum x burkwoodii ‘Mohawk’ | Burkwood Viburnum [above]
I WOULD use this cultivar, but my teacher says he wouldn’t because it’s not too exicting past bloom time. Nice specimen at Greensprings Garden in VA. Has really great soft pink emerging from tight wine colored buds.
USE FOR ….. good for woodland or contemporary garden, borders, in mass
HARDINESS ….. zones 4 to 8, hardiest of the pom pom frangrant cultivars
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 5′ to 6′, maybe smaller than other V. dilatatums
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. open, multi-stemmed, nice branching habit, never as dense as V. x juddii or V. carlesii
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1″-3″ spear or almost heart shaped, soft fuzzy, grooved viens
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | medium green, somewhat shiney, sporadic red in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 5″, pale pink white pom poms, 10 days in May to June
FLORETS | many, spicey soft fragrance
BERRIES | cool shiney yellow Sept to Dec, heavy racimes

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Viburnum dilatatum
‘Michael Dodge’ | Linden Viburnum [above]
I WOULD use this cultivar, but may not be as available as other Viburnums. Nice specimen at Greensprings Garden in VA. Has really tremendously beautiful shiney yellow berries.
USE FOR ….. good for woodland or contemporary garden, borders
HARDINESS ….. zones 5 to 7, leaves hold late, better with some shade in Mid-Atlantic
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 5′ to 6′, maybe smaller than other V. dilatatums
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. open, but full of folliage, can get a bit leggy
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-5″ rounded, grooved veins like others, leathery
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | medium green, somewhat shiney, coppery tinged in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 5″, creamy white, flat landing pads covering the plant, 10 days in May to June
FLORETS | many
BERRIES | cool shiney yellow Sept to Dec, heavy berry show

Viburnum ‘Chesapeake’ | Chesapeake Viburnum
listed in Dirr as a cultivar under V. utile | Service Viburnum
developed at US Arboretum, I WOULD use, looks good against walls
USE FOR ….. more formal, old southern, romantic setting
HARDINESS ….. Not as hardy as ‘Eskimo’
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′/10′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. compact, mounded, wide
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ spear shaped, leathery, wavy
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | dark green, turning bright yellow in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″, round balls dark pink buds openning to showy white, peak mid April, nice fragrance
FLORETS | 65 per flower
BERRIES | dull red to black

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Viburnum ‘Conoy’ | Conoy Viburnum [above]
listed in Dirr as a cultivar under V. utile | Service Viburnum
developed at US Arboretum, I probably won’t use, it’s fine but I like others
I prefer ‘Chesapeake’ because of fragrance, Conoy is also too uniform for me
USE FOR ….. more formal, old southern, romantic setting
HARDINESS ….. Not as hardy as ‘Eskimo’
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′/10′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. spreading, mounded, wide
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ spear shaped, leathery, wavy
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | glossy dark green, turning maroon in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″, round balls dark pink buds openning to showy white, peak mid April, mildly fragrant
FLORETS | 75 per flower
BERRIES | dull red to black

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Viburnum
‘Eskimo’ | Eskimo Viburnum [above]
listed in Dirr as a cultivar under V. utile | Service Viburnum
developed at US Arboretum, I WOULD use
Eskimo has really nice little ball blooms packed with florets but no fragrance
USE FOR ….. more formal, old southern, romantic setting
HARDINESS ….. hardiest of US Arboretum hybrids
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′ to 8′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. compact, stretched mounded, super dense
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ spear shaped, flat, not wavey like others
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | glossy dark green, turning bright yellow in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 4″, round balls dark pink buds openning to showy white, peak later April, no frangrance
FLORETS | 80 to 120 florets per flower, “show stoppers” says Dirr
BERRIES | dull red to black

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Viburnum nudum ‘Winterthur’ | Winterthur Viburnum aka Smooth Witherod [above]
listed in Dirr with Viburnum cassinoides | Witherrod Viburnum.
I Will use, if I can find, especially this cultivar. The very lustrous green and red leaf color is really a treat in the fall.
USE FOR ….. Good for screens, or specimen in border or woodland setting
HARDINESS ….. does well in Mid-Atlantic
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 5′ to 6′, medium to slow growing
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. compact, rounded, full, dense
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3.5″-4.5″/.75″ tp 2.5″ eliptical with point, very smooth but veins still a bit grooved
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | almost waxy bronze to chocolate when emerging, turning bright green, even more smooth than V. cassinoides
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 2″ to 5″, landing pads, white with yellow stamens in June to July
FLORETS | many
BERRIES | wonderful feature, turning from green to pink to red to blue and finally black, many colors seen simultanously

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Viburnum opulus | European Cranberry Bush Viburnum [above]
Similar 3 lobed leaves to Viburnum trilobum | American Cranberry Bush and Viburnum sargentii | Sargent Viburnum.
I WOULD use, I need to learn more about the cultivars but there is one listed ‘Nanum’, only 24″ that I will seek out.
USE FOR ….. Great for screens, on large residential, park or comercial landscapes
HARDINESS ….. zonese 3 – 8
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 8′ to 10′, spreading
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. upright, multi-stemmed, arching branches formes thicket
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-4″, tri-lobed with soft serration
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium to bright green, new growth tinged with red, really nice like maple
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 2″ to 4″, landing pads white in May
FLORETS | white outer ring with fertile inner, creating a lovely “pinwheel effect” says Dirr
BERRIES | showy red in Sept-Oct, birds love, shrivle to raisons in winter

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Viburnum plicatum var tomentosum
| Doublefile Viburnum [both above]
I WOULD this sometimes, can get kinda large, so pick small sized cultivars. Some including ‘Mariesii’ are not sterile, be careful with this one. Some, including ‘Shasta’ are sterile and won’t spread. Great bird food.
USE FOR ….. elegant, strong architecture, fatastic blooms both pom poms and landing pads depending on cultivar.
HARDINESS ….. zones 3 to 7, perfect for Mid-Atlantic
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 8′ to 10′, slowish, lives 45 years
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. tiered horizontal branching, with long spires, ID by this, unique look for Viburnum
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-4″ rounded with very pointy tip, serrate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium green, impressed viens
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 5″, white pom poms, but mostly landing pads, depending
FLORETS | many, no fragrance
BERRIES | egg shaped, bright red, friuts early June to August

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Viburnum prunifolium | Blackhaw Viburnum [above]
I WOULD use, especially nice as a small tree. It has striking dark purplish leaves so needs either open space or light green for best contrast and to make it stand out. Does well in dry soil, too.
USE FOR ….. good for woodland or formal, alone or in mass, handsome
HARDINESS ….. zones 3 to 9, sun or shade, adaptable to soil
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 12′ to 20′, slow to medium
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. multi-stemmed or single, rounded outline but “stiffly branched”, shape and brnches look a bit like a Hawthorne
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3.5″ eleptical spear, course
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | dark green, smooth, red to purple brighter in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 2″ to 4″, creamy white landing pads
FLORETS | many
BERRIES | pinkish rose drupe changing to blueish black, etible, tastes pretty good at least the Colonists liked it

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Viburnum x pragense | Prague Viburnum [Prague above right, Eskimo left]
listed in Dirr as related to V. rhytidophyllum | Leatherleaf Viburnum
I WOULD use, sparingly I guess although because you can have too much of this good thing.
Supposed to be extremely hardy, yes from Prague the city.
USE FOR ….. Good for screens, only in extra-large residential, park or comercial landscapes
HARDINESS ….. super hardy to -17 degrees
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 10′ to 15′, fast growing, spreading
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. woody, full
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″-7″ largest, narrow spear shaped
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | lustrous dark green, new growth soft and soft on bottom
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 4″, landing pads start pink to brown to white
FLORETS | 100+ florets per flower, warm smelling
BERRIES | dull red to black

IMG_7885.JPGViburnum rhytidophyllum | Leatherleaf Viburnum [above]
I probably WON’T use, has eaten my neighbor’s back yard. We will try to most of it out but it is indeed a successful screen, but looks kinda droopy most of the time.
USE FOR ….. Good for screens, only in extra-large residential, park or comercial landscapes
HARDINESS ….. super hardy to -17 degrees
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 10′ to 15′, fast growing, spreading
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. woody, leggy, rounded outline, multi-stemmed
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″-7″ largest, very narrow spear shaped
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | lduller green, strongly grooved
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 4″, landing pads start pink to brown to white, the brown is down right dingy looking
FLORETS | 100+ florets per flower
BERRIES | dull red to black

Chionanthus virginicus | Fringe Tree

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above Chionanthus retusus blooms, closely related to the native version

Chionanthus virginicus | Fringe Tree

CHARACTER
Native to MD and the east coast piedmont and accross to the mid-west, found wild in the woods or available at the nursery. This is a versital tree, a good pick for a variety of circulmstances. Open and airy branching with very showy, fringey blooms that have a lovely spicey scent. The native Fringe Tree is smaller than its Asian cousin, Chionanthus retusus | Chinese Fringe Tree which is also beautiful with gorgeous exfoliating bark with denser folliage. Both have graceful branches and like to live on the edges peaking into the sun from the shadey side. Good in mass or alone.

CARE
Basically problem free – EASY. This one is for you, if you don’t want to do any maintenance. Can be pruned if it becomes leggy.
NOTES
Dioecious – you need both, but both flower. Males slightly more showy. Blooms in late May to June when not much else is blooming, good for transition.
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
Cultivars (vs liberating one from the wild) will produce nicer plants in general, not surprisingly, but the distinctions between those available at the nursery aren’t significant. Any Fringe Tree will do.

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Chionanathus retusus | Chinese Fringe Tree (above)
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 20′-30′/same
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Upright, spreading and rounded but more dense than C. retusus
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-6″ rounded, sometimes with point
FLOWERS | white fringey long 1″ long petals, lacey, lasts 2 weeks
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | darker green, glossier green
BARK ….. outstanding exfoliating exfoliating

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Chionanathus viginicus | Fringe Tree (above)
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 10′ to 15′ /8′ to 12′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Loose, rounded; many horizontal and ascending branches, single or multi-stemmed, small tree or large shrub, fountain-like outline, folliage at end of stems
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2.5″to 6″ spear shaped, narrow
FLOWERS | white fringey long 2″ long petals, lacey, lasts a month
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium green, a bit duller than C. retusus
STEM ….. squarish, brown with prominant lenticils, but basically smooth

BOTH
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 7 – 9 | full sun to full shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow to medium
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, opposite
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FALL COLOR | soft yellow
FRUIT | insignificant, small drupes of blue in September

NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL prefers deep moist, well drained, but very adaptable, in the wild found along streams
C. viginicus native MD, NJ to FL and west to TX
C. retusus native to Asia but well suited to east coast and not invasive
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MO Botanical Gardens / Chionanthus viginicus

Dave’s Garden / Chionanthus virginicus

MO Botanical Gardens / Chionanthus retusus

Dave’s Garden / Chionanthus retusus

Flickr / dogwood*design / Chionanthus pics

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