Archive for the 'trees | deciduous' Category

The Great Viburnum List

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[above Viburnum opulus 'Compactus' | European Cranberry Bush]

Viburnum ssp | Viburnum

Ok Ray, you asked for this. Here is my list of Viburnums for all occasions. I hope to add to this list over time since there are so many to choose from and something for any garden circumstance. So when I have to dig deep to find the right plant, I will know to start here at this list. They are together here in one post so we can compare them easily.
CHARACTER
At home in the Northern hemisphere of the world, it’s difficult to describe this genus as a group since their traits are varried depending on species and cultivar. Generally, in the Mid-Atlantic, Viburnum is evergreen or at least semi-evergreen, adaptable but great in light shade, and have hydrangea-like blooms many with fragrance or berries. When I picture Viburnum in my head, I think of leathery down turned rhododendron-like leaves, but in fact their folliage can be quite different so it’s good to get to know the cultivars you like on a personal basis. Still the qualites listed above make them a versital standard for any garden. If you can’t figure out what would be a good plant to use for a specific need, turn to Viburnums before you get frustrated.

CARE
Easy to care for but many need and or benefit from annual pruning, especially the more woody larger ones. Occassionally effected by aphids or nematodes (in the south), but no serious problems on the whole.
NOTES
150 species of shrubs and small trees. The blooms are called corymbs and look like round pom poms or flatter landing pads. Selective or tip prune, don’t shear.
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 5 – 9 | full sun to part shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow to medium
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL likes well drained acid soil. but very adaptable
Native all over northern hemisphere of the world

LINKS
dogwood*design on Flickr / pics in Viburnum set
Dave’s Garden / Viburnum comments on many cultivars

MO Botanical Garden / Doublefile Viburnum


RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO

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Viburnum x burkwoodii ‘Mohawk’ | Burkwood Viburnum [above]
I WOULD use this cultivar, but my teacher says he wouldn’t because it’s not too exicting past bloom time. Nice specimen at Greensprings Garden in VA. Has really great soft pink emerging from tight wine colored buds.
USE FOR ….. good for woodland or contemporary garden, borders, in mass
HARDINESS ….. zones 4 to 8, hardiest of the pom pom frangrant cultivars
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 5′ to 6′, maybe smaller than other V. dilatatums
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. open, multi-stemmed, nice branching habit, never as dense as V. x juddii or V. carlesii
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1″-3″ spear or almost heart shaped, soft fuzzy, grooved viens
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | medium green, somewhat shiney, sporadic red in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 5″, pale pink white pom poms, 10 days in May to June
FLORETS | many, spicey soft fragrance
BERRIES | cool shiney yellow Sept to Dec, heavy racimes

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Viburnum dilatatum
‘Michael Dodge’ | Linden Viburnum [above]
I WOULD use this cultivar, but may not be as available as other Viburnums. Nice specimen at Greensprings Garden in VA. Has really tremendously beautiful shiney yellow berries.
USE FOR ….. good for woodland or contemporary garden, borders
HARDINESS ….. zones 5 to 7, leaves hold late, better with some shade in Mid-Atlantic
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 5′ to 6′, maybe smaller than other V. dilatatums
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. open, but full of folliage, can get a bit leggy
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-5″ rounded, grooved veins like others, leathery
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | medium green, somewhat shiney, coppery tinged in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 5″, creamy white, flat landing pads covering the plant, 10 days in May to June
FLORETS | many
BERRIES | cool shiney yellow Sept to Dec, heavy berry show

Viburnum ‘Chesapeake’ | Chesapeake Viburnum
listed in Dirr as a cultivar under V. utile | Service Viburnum
developed at US Arboretum, I WOULD use, looks good against walls
USE FOR ….. more formal, old southern, romantic setting
HARDINESS ….. Not as hardy as ‘Eskimo’
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′/10′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. compact, mounded, wide
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ spear shaped, leathery, wavy
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | dark green, turning bright yellow in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″, round balls dark pink buds openning to showy white, peak mid April, nice fragrance
FLORETS | 65 per flower
BERRIES | dull red to black

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Viburnum ‘Conoy’ | Conoy Viburnum [above]
listed in Dirr as a cultivar under V. utile | Service Viburnum
developed at US Arboretum, I probably won’t use, it’s fine but I like others
I prefer ‘Chesapeake’ because of fragrance, Conoy is also too uniform for me
USE FOR ….. more formal, old southern, romantic setting
HARDINESS ….. Not as hardy as ‘Eskimo’
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′/10′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. spreading, mounded, wide
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ spear shaped, leathery, wavy
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | glossy dark green, turning maroon in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″, round balls dark pink buds openning to showy white, peak mid April, mildly fragrant
FLORETS | 75 per flower
BERRIES | dull red to black

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Viburnum
‘Eskimo’ | Eskimo Viburnum [above]
listed in Dirr as a cultivar under V. utile | Service Viburnum
developed at US Arboretum, I WOULD use
Eskimo has really nice little ball blooms packed with florets but no fragrance
USE FOR ….. more formal, old southern, romantic setting
HARDINESS ….. hardiest of US Arboretum hybrids
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 6′ to 8′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. compact, stretched mounded, super dense
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ spear shaped, flat, not wavey like others
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | glossy dark green, turning bright yellow in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 4″, round balls dark pink buds openning to showy white, peak later April, no frangrance
FLORETS | 80 to 120 florets per flower, “show stoppers” says Dirr
BERRIES | dull red to black

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Viburnum nudum ‘Winterthur’ | Winterthur Viburnum aka Smooth Witherod [above]
listed in Dirr with Viburnum cassinoides | Witherrod Viburnum.
I Will use, if I can find, especially this cultivar. The very lustrous green and red leaf color is really a treat in the fall.
USE FOR ….. Good for screens, or specimen in border or woodland setting
HARDINESS ….. does well in Mid-Atlantic
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 5′ to 6′, medium to slow growing
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. compact, rounded, full, dense
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3.5″-4.5″/.75″ tp 2.5″ eliptical with point, very smooth but veins still a bit grooved
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | almost waxy bronze to chocolate when emerging, turning bright green, even more smooth than V. cassinoides
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 2″ to 5″, landing pads, white with yellow stamens in June to July
FLORETS | many
BERRIES | wonderful feature, turning from green to pink to red to blue and finally black, many colors seen simultanously

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Viburnum opulus | European Cranberry Bush Viburnum [above]
Similar 3 lobed leaves to Viburnum trilobum | American Cranberry Bush and Viburnum sargentii | Sargent Viburnum.
I WOULD use, I need to learn more about the cultivars but there is one listed ‘Nanum’, only 24″ that I will seek out.
USE FOR ….. Great for screens, on large residential, park or comercial landscapes
HARDINESS ….. zonese 3 – 8
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 8′ to 10′, spreading
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. upright, multi-stemmed, arching branches formes thicket
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-4″, tri-lobed with soft serration
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium to bright green, new growth tinged with red, really nice like maple
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 2″ to 4″, landing pads white in May
FLORETS | white outer ring with fertile inner, creating a lovely “pinwheel effect” says Dirr
BERRIES | showy red in Sept-Oct, birds love, shrivle to raisons in winter

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Viburnum plicatum var tomentosum
| Doublefile Viburnum [both above]
I WOULD this sometimes, can get kinda large, so pick small sized cultivars. Some including ‘Mariesii’ are not sterile, be careful with this one. Some, including ‘Shasta’ are sterile and won’t spread. Great bird food.
USE FOR ….. elegant, strong architecture, fatastic blooms both pom poms and landing pads depending on cultivar.
HARDINESS ….. zones 3 to 7, perfect for Mid-Atlantic
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 8′ to 10′, slowish, lives 45 years
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. tiered horizontal branching, with long spires, ID by this, unique look for Viburnum
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-4″ rounded with very pointy tip, serrate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium green, impressed viens
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 5″, white pom poms, but mostly landing pads, depending
FLORETS | many, no fragrance
BERRIES | egg shaped, bright red, friuts early June to August

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Viburnum prunifolium | Blackhaw Viburnum [above]
I WOULD use, especially nice as a small tree. It has striking dark purplish leaves so needs either open space or light green for best contrast and to make it stand out. Does well in dry soil, too.
USE FOR ….. good for woodland or formal, alone or in mass, handsome
HARDINESS ….. zones 3 to 9, sun or shade, adaptable to soil
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 12′ to 20′, slow to medium
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. multi-stemmed or single, rounded outline but “stiffly branched”, shape and brnches look a bit like a Hawthorne
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3.5″ eleptical spear, course
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | dark green, smooth, red to purple brighter in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 2″ to 4″, creamy white landing pads
FLORETS | many
BERRIES | pinkish rose drupe changing to blueish black, etible, tastes pretty good at least the Colonists liked it

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Viburnum x pragense | Prague Viburnum [Prague above right, Eskimo left]
listed in Dirr as related to V. rhytidophyllum | Leatherleaf Viburnum
I WOULD use, sparingly I guess although because you can have too much of this good thing.
Supposed to be extremely hardy, yes from Prague the city.
USE FOR ….. Good for screens, only in extra-large residential, park or comercial landscapes
HARDINESS ….. super hardy to -17 degrees
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 10′ to 15′, fast growing, spreading
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. woody, full
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″-7″ largest, narrow spear shaped
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | lustrous dark green, new growth soft and soft on bottom
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 4″, landing pads start pink to brown to white
FLORETS | 100+ florets per flower, warm smelling
BERRIES | dull red to black

IMG_7885.JPGViburnum rhytidophyllum | Leatherleaf Viburnum [above]
I probably WON’T use, has eaten my neighbor’s back yard. We will try to most of it out but it is indeed a successful screen, but looks kinda droopy most of the time.
USE FOR ….. Good for screens, only in extra-large residential, park or comercial landscapes
HARDINESS ….. super hardy to -17 degrees
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 10′ to 15′, fast growing, spreading
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. woody, leggy, rounded outline, multi-stemmed
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″-7″ largest, very narrow spear shaped
LEAF COLOR ….. Semi-evergreen | lduller green, strongly grooved
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 3″ to 4″, landing pads start pink to brown to white, the brown is down right dingy looking
FLORETS | 100+ florets per flower
BERRIES | dull red to black

Chionanthus virginicus | Fringe Tree

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above Chionanthus retusus blooms, closely related to the native version

Chionanthus virginicus | Fringe Tree

CHARACTER
Native to MD and the east coast piedmont and accross to the mid-west, found wild in the woods or available at the nursery. This is a versital tree, a good pick for a variety of circulmstances. Open and airy branching with very showy, fringey blooms that have a lovely spicey scent. The native Fringe Tree is smaller than its Asian cousin, Chionanthus retusus | Chinese Fringe Tree which is also beautiful with gorgeous exfoliating bark with denser folliage. Both have graceful branches and like to live on the edges peaking into the sun from the shadey side. Good in mass or alone.

CARE
Basically problem free – EASY. This one is for you, if you don’t want to do any maintenance. Can be pruned if it becomes leggy.
NOTES
Dioecious – you need both, but both flower. Males slightly more showy. Blooms in late May to June when not much else is blooming, good for transition.
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
Cultivars (vs liberating one from the wild) will produce nicer plants in general, not surprisingly, but the distinctions between those available at the nursery aren’t significant. Any Fringe Tree will do.

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Chionanathus retusus | Chinese Fringe Tree (above)
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 20′-30′/same
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Upright, spreading and rounded but more dense than C. retusus
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-6″ rounded, sometimes with point
FLOWERS | white fringey long 1″ long petals, lacey, lasts 2 weeks
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | darker green, glossier green
BARK ….. outstanding exfoliating exfoliating

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Chionanathus viginicus | Fringe Tree (above)
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 10′ to 15′ /8′ to 12′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Loose, rounded; many horizontal and ascending branches, single or multi-stemmed, small tree or large shrub, fountain-like outline, folliage at end of stems
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2.5″to 6″ spear shaped, narrow
FLOWERS | white fringey long 2″ long petals, lacey, lasts a month
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium green, a bit duller than C. retusus
STEM ….. squarish, brown with prominant lenticils, but basically smooth

BOTH
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 7 – 9 | full sun to full shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow to medium
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, opposite
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FALL COLOR | soft yellow
FRUIT | insignificant, small drupes of blue in September

NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL prefers deep moist, well drained, but very adaptable, in the wild found along streams
C. viginicus native MD, NJ to FL and west to TX
C. retusus native to Asia but well suited to east coast and not invasive
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MO Botanical Gardens / Chionanthus viginicus

Dave’s Garden / Chionanthus virginicus

MO Botanical Gardens / Chionanthus retusus

Dave’s Garden / Chionanthus retusus

Flickr / dogwood*design / Chionanthus pics

Aesculus x carnea | Red Horsechestnut

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Aesculus x carnea | Red Horsechestnut

CHARACTER
One of the most popular trees in England, according to Dirr. One of it parents, Aesculus pavia | Red Buckeye, is a native (id with rattlesnake like nuts pods) and so well suited to Mid-Atlantic planting. Dirr goes on to explain that this somewhat mysterious hybrid is the result of chromosomal doubling somewhere along the line. What ever the cause, the Red Horsechestnut is tidy looking small tree, a naturalizer with palmately compound leaves and wonderful extra large pink spire blooms (the florets are actually white, yellow and pink all at the same time). ‘Briotti’ is especially nice with deeper, redder, larger panicles of flowers in earluy May. Nice for DC Townhouse garden patios.
CARE
Prune in early spring.
NOTES
Adaptable to different soil types, tough-ish. Nuts are good food for deer and squirrels.
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RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Briotti’ Blood red blooms, up to 12″ tall
‘Ft. McNair’ a recent introduction from Ft. McNair in Washington, DC
Aesculus hippocastanum | Common Horsechestnut 50′ tall for parks, too big for residential
Aesculus parviflora | Bottlebrush Buckeye great native shrub with cool bottlebrush white blooms
Aesculus pavia | Red Buckeye native giant shrub or clumping tree, rattlesnake nut pods

ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 4 – 7 | full sun to full shade
GROWTH RATE ….. medium
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 30′-40′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Rounded, multi-branched
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″to 6″, 5 leaflets with long petiole
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. palmately compound, opposite, doubley serrate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | dark green, lustrous and leathery

FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | beautiful, pink, white and yellow 6″ to 8″ tall and 4″ wide panicle turn into Buckeyes (nuts)

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NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL needs well drained, pH adaptable, grows well in Mid-Atlantic
Native to Europe, possibly developed in Germany

UCONN plant database / Aesculus x carnea

Salisberry Arboretum / Aesculus x carnea

Flickr / search for Aesculus x carnea

Cercis canadensis | Eastern Redbud

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Cercis canadensis | Eastern Redbud

CHARACTER
Native to MD and the East Coast piedmont, a truely charming tree that is at home in the woodland garden or a more formal setting. Driving in the Shanandoah or even just on I-95 they appear in the understory like a mysterious purple veil caught in the evergreens as the signal spring is really here. Glorious in full bloom, with the snowpea-like bloom sitting very close (on only 1/2 inch pedicel) to the branches even the large ones. The bark is smooth dark steel gray, they can be single stemmed or less often multi and assume a vase shape with a broad top. Redbuds have heart shaped leaves that emerge after the blooms. They bloom at the same time as American Dogwoods which make great garden companions. Closely related is the slightly more exotic Chinese Redbud, which has blooms basically ON the branches.

CARE
Is very adaptable to a variety of soil conditions, acid to alkaline, except exceedingly wet. Stress can do harm, so is best to pay some attention to it by adding organic material and regular watering. Canker can be an issue if tree becomes weakened. Pests are usually nothing to worry about.

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NOTES
Deer aren’t particularly interested

RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Alba’
White blooms, so bright and peaceful
‘Forest Pansy’ leaves melow to a dark burgandy, “leaves emerge a shimmering, screaming red” says Dirr
‘Silver Cloud’ has mottled green, white purple and pink leaves, best in shadier sites
Cercis chinensis | Chinese Redbud
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE …..
4 – 9 | full sun to part shade
GROWTH RATE …..
medium, 7 to 10 inches in 5 yrs, faster with proper water and care
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 20′-30′/25′ to 30′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Vase shaped, single or multi-stemmed, sometimes reaching
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″-5″ heart shaped
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | emerge redish, turning bright green, a bit tired looking by end of summer, turning nice fall yellow before they dropFEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | small pinkish purple in March to April, coming right off branches, cool effect
FRUIT | legume pod, brownish black 2″ to 3″ long
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL does well in moist, organic soil
Native NJ to FL and west to TX, and Mexico
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LINKS

dogwood*designer/flickr/Cercis canadensis

MO Botanical Garden / Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’

NC State / Cercis canadensis

Dave’s Garden / Cecis canadensis

Amelanchier arborea | Serviceberry

IMG_6503.JPGAmelanchier arborea | Serviceberry

CHARACTER
Native to MD, and Northeast US. Beautiful small tree or very large shrub. Multistemmed with amazing red fall color. But the lacey white racemes of flowers which cover the plants are the real joy of this plant. Can be id’d by its yellow-green buds and pendulous friuts. Serviceberry has red edible fruit, berry like pomes, that tastes like the sweetest blueberries and are enjoyed by birds. Great to soften building corners or naturalize yards where there is space. Nice with dark backdrops to emphasize the shape. They hardly need any attention to thrive.
CARE
Transplant B&B. Keep in shape by removing unwanted succors.
NOTES
Also known as Juneberry and Shadblow (weird name) refferring to the bloom time when shad run.

Amelanchier arborea grove

Amelanchier arborea grove | photo: AnnaMollyMadison

RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
Amelanchier grandiflora ‘Princess Diana’ at Greensprings, VA
Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Autumn Fire’ and ‘Autumn Brilliance’ recommended by my designer friend, Cathy
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 4 – 9 | full sun to part shade
GROWTH RATE ….. medium, 9′ to 10′ in 8 years
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 15′-25′ but sometimes up to 40′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Loose, rounded; many horizontal and ascending branches
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 1.5″-3″ obovate, impressed veins, obtusely serrated, thin, light
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | medium green, turning yellow, apricot or deep red in fall
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
STEM
| olive green to red-brown, green pith, smooth
FLOWERS | 5 petals, 2″ to 4″ long racemes, small white in early April
BERRIES | beautiful bright orange red, orange shaped pome (rose family) 1/4″ diameter
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL tollerates streambanks to dry roadsides to hillsides, but not particularly polution tollerant, acid lovers
Native MD to FL and west to TX

UCONN plant database / Amelanchier arborea

MO Botanic Garden / Amelancheir arborea
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Find Your Roots | Technology

FIND YOUR ROOTS
When planting near trees, it’s great if you know where the tree roots are so you can avoid doing damage to them. Many people don’t realize that the first top 6 inches of soil is where the vast majority of all tree roots are and that they generally spread out way beyond the canopy. This artist’s illustration of a real tree and it’s roots from the Morton Arboretum (in Chicago), shows the truth of the matter very plainly. An arborist from Care of Trees, shared this drawing with me. They specialize in you guessed it …

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SOIL COMPACTION
Damaging soil compaction often happens when people renovate their homes. It can’t be helped when big digging and multi-ton equipment is envolved. A “hardpan” forms at or under the surface and people see the poor water filtration symptomatically. The worst compaction happens when soil is wet and then basically squished beyond belief, expunging air from between soil particles, leaving no room for nuetrients, air and water to circulate. Everything a tree needs, except sunlight, comes from underground, so you can see why soil compaction stresses a tree. For a more in depth, but fairly understandable explanation of the topic, read University of Georgia article, Soil Compaction & Trees, Causes, Symptoms & Effects by Dr. Kim Coder.
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this photo was originally uploaded by canopy photo. A professional arborist used an air spade to check this Live Oak’s roots for health and vitality.

ROOT TECHNOLOGY
People in this bussiness can use great technology to help you save and keep your mature trees even with major home or landscape renovation. They can help prevent soil compaction by using “protection and airation mats”, that distribute the weight of heavy equiment or top soil or even a concrete path over the top of roots, while allowing proper air and water flow; or “de-compact” soils using a tool called an “air spade” which blasts air into the soil at mach 2, lifting compacted soil. After that you can renovate the soil with appropriate organic material by “radial or vertical mulching”. I think this is fantastic.  This artical from GROUNDS MAINTENANCE by E. Thomas Smiley, explains these treatments more fully.

Corylopsis species | Winterhazel

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originally uploaded by jonhues

Corylopsis species | Winterhazel


CHARACTER
Lightest lemon yellow bell shaped blooms paired with lance shaped leaves that look like Willow leaves. Blooms in early March, tough as nails with lovely fragrance. Can be used as small tree of large shrub, different varieties have different shapes to choose from depending on what you want – vase shaped or wide spreading. Flowers happen before the leaves appear.
CARE
Needs to be planted with a bit of shelter to protect blooms from frost damage. Amend soil with peat moss or leaf mold. Plants should be pruned following flowering.
NOTES
Pricey, but so much nicer than your average Forsythia. It’s good to get B&B 2″ CAL / 6′. I prefer this.
RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
Corylopsis pauciflora | Buttercup Winterhazel vase shaped, more tree-like, nice for woodland setting and modern gardens, flowers later, maybe April
Corylopsis spicata wide spreading up to 14′, bowl shape, half as tall, pink filaments, emerging leaves have purple tint, native to Mnts of Japan
Corylopsis glabrescens most hardy

ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 5 – 8 | full sun to light shade
GROWTH RATE ….. slow to medium
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 8′-15′/7′ to 15′
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Rounded long arching branches or more upright vase shape
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-4″/1″-3 ovate, wide acuminate, slight teeth, a bit fuzzy, delicate
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | dark green, turning bright yellow to gold in fall, leaves hang on and are killed by frost
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | long pendulous racemes of bearing multiple 1″ bell shaped lightest yellow
STEM | long rounded, zig-zag ID with full pith (Forsythia has hollow, chambered and brown)
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL does well in moist well drained, acid soil
Native to Japan, introduced 1905


Paghat’s Garden / Corylopsis pauciflora
MO Botanical Garden / Corylopsis glabrescens

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Salix babylonica | Weeping Willow

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Salix babylonica | Weeping Willow
CHARACTER
Native to MD, a graceful woodland naturalizer, great in wet lowlands. Willows are water lovers and perfect if you have a soggy spot you’d like to plant in. It will absorb a lot. Its long yellow tendrils will touch the ground. Adaptable to almost all soil conditions and happy in sun or shade. It has a dreamy power and most people feel good when they get near one.

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CARE
Tougher than Liriodendron tulipifera, but still suseptible to wind and ice storms. They grow easily by basically putting a cutting right in the ground and will rejuvinate from a stump if knocked to the ground – I have seen this happen right at the end of my street. Don’t suffer from pests.
NOTES
Extract from Willow bark is one componant of aspirin. Don’t plant near underground septic tanks or pipes since willows seek out water. Dioecious, males are showy. I was advised by a great landscape contractor never to use this in residential landscape unless it is off in a field because you can’t ever get rid of them but they break often since they are week wooded. Best to put them in a view where they won’t be disturbed, but if they are it won’t matter.

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RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
Over 250 species of Salix, hard to tell apart
Salix matsudana‘Contorta’ | Dragon’s Claw (above) the name says it all, twisted branches, curly leaves
Salix caprea | Pussywillow this is only one of a few salix called “pussywillow”, some are upright, some are weeping

ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 2 – 9 | full sun to full shade
GROWTH RATE ….. fast
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 30′-40′/same
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Large arching branches, with extremely flexible “whips” stems
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″-5″/ .5″-1″ spear shaped
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | light lime green or yellow
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | in sp, male catkins white fluffy

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NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL does well in moist to wet, any type
Native MD and the rest of America
MO Botanical Garden / Salix matsudana ‘Tortuosa’

Brooklyn Botanic Garden / Willow Key

Cornus mas | Corneliancherry Dogwood

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Cornus mas | Corneliancherry Dogwood

CHARACTER
The exfoliating cinnamon bark is beautiful and terrific in winter. An underused understory tree wonderful for natualizing a woodland garden. Tough enough to thrive in urban settings. Good for shade. One of the earliest bloomers of the season (March) with the flowers gathered in clusters. The fresh, yellow star-like flowers are tiny. Like many dogwoods has bright happy fall color.
CARE
Care-free. Prune up to begin with and for rejuvination of older specimens. Otherwise is does well with little attention.
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NOTES
Deer are not interested. No Anthracnose or other disease or pests. “mas” translates as male refferring to the natural vigor of this tree. Yellow blooms are similar to Forsythia, but the tree is more dependable. Use as alternative if you have the space. Can be used for deciduous windbreak.

RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
‘Golden Glory’ widely available, heavy bloomer
‘Aurea’ yellow folliage form, very hardy, leaves go green in summer heat, though. Still I’m going to look for and use it.


ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 3 – 8 | part sun to most shade
GROWTH RATE ….. medium to slow
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 15′-25′/ same width
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Upright, multistemmed, rounded, gets sparse with age (time to prune)
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 2″to 4″/ 1″to 2″ typical dogwood shape
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, opposite
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | deep green, red-plum fall color
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | yellow, tiny, clustered
BARK | one of it’s best features, and it has many. The bark looks a lot like Platanus, but with warm hues.
BERRIES | red berries in fall, attractive and edible by birds

NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL needs moist, acid, peaty soil – add leaf mold, can take clay
Native to Southern and Central Europe, Southwestern Asia

Ohio State / Cornus mas

MO Botanical Garden / Cornus mas ‘Golden Glory’

UCONN / Cornus mas


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originally uploaded by intheburg

Magnolia x soulangiana | Saucer Magnolia

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These Saucer Magnolias growing right in the shade of a huge black walnut, caught my eye. They were old and healthy for sure.

Magnolia x soulangiana | Saucer Magnolia

CHARACTER
Wonderful large petals and an amazing array of color form and growth habit. The Saucer Magnolia is very popular, almost too popular, but lovely none-the-less. Dirr suggests planting in groups which I think is a nice idea if you have the space. Perhaps best not to make it your only or most prominant focal point since late frosts obliterate the blooms every few years in this area.

CARE
Magnolias have very shallow root systems. If you transplant, take care not to plant the root colar below the soil or risk retardation or death. Needs protection from strong winds. This striking tree needs special attention to site. It needs full sun, but real protection from wind. Best not to plant it in southern exposure so not to speed the bloom time. Does quite well in the South. If you can site properly, get ready for and wonderful view.
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NOTES
Magnolias are a very old genera of plants dating back 100 million years, as does the beetle that pollinates it. Look for cold hardy cultivars.

RELATED VARIETIES | CULTIVARS | EXTRA INFO
Little Girl Hybrid ‘Ann’ 8′to 10′Dirr’s Fav
Little Girl Hybrid ‘Jane’ hardier and better for use in the North
Magnolia liliiflora ‘Nigra’ may be found for sale, but difficult
ZONES HARDINESS | SUN OR SHADE ….. 4 – 9 | full sun to light shade
GROWTH RATE ….. medium, 10′ to 15′ in 10 years
HEIGHT / WIDTH ….. 20′-30′/ as wide or wider
PLANT SHAPE & BRANCHING ….. Dense, multistemmed, spreading, upright, close set leaves
LEAF FORM & SHAPE ….. 3″to 6″/ 1.5″to 3″ obovate
LEAF ARRANGEMENT ….. simple, alternate
LEAF COLOR ….. Deciduous | dark green on top pubescent below
FEATURES, BUDS, FLOWERS, FRUIT
FLOWERS | 5″to 10″ wide, 9 tepals, white to pink to purple often combo of colors
BUDS | like other small magnolias are very furry like little rabbit feet.
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originallyy uploaded by derAmialtebloede
NATIVE HABITAT
SOIL needs moist, acid, peaty soil – add leaf mold
Native to Japan
Clemson / Magnolias comparrison

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